Seats of Power
Apr
27
to Jul 21

Seats of Power

  • August Wilson African American Cultural Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Seats of Power, a group exhibition of artworks by Women of Visions, Inc., pays tribute to prominent and unsung heroes, mentors, and sources of inspiration that echo stories of the past, present, and future. This exhibition honors those who saw teachable moments in WOV artists and helped to shape their character and their art.  The multiple interactions with mentors over the decades have given WOV inspiration to empower others.

Women of Visions, Inc., based in Pittsburgh, supports, cultivates and promotes the diverse contributions of African-American women in the arts through exhibition, lectures, film, and programs that serve, educate, and enrich the African-American community.  

Seats of Power is organized by Kilolo Luckett, Curator of Visual Arts, in collaboration with Women of Visions, Inc.

This exhibition is generously supported by Advancing Black Arts in Pittsburgh, a partnership of The Pittsburgh Foundation and The Heinz Endowments, Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council - Lift Grant, and the August Wilson African American Cultural Center.

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Colorism: Looking Outside the Brown Paper Bag January 19 - February 16, 2019
Jan
19
to Feb 16

Colorism: Looking Outside the Brown Paper Bag January 19 - February 16, 2019

COLORISM: LOOKING OUTSIDE THE

BROWN PAPER BAG

A solo exhibition by Ashley A. Jones

Curated by Tara Fay Coleman

Opening: Saturday, January 19, 6-9pm

Closing: Saturday, February 16, 6-9pm

Gallery Hours: Sundays 1-4pm, or by Appointment 

https://www.phosphorpgh.com/colorism-looking-outside-the-brown-paper-bag

Colorism: Looking Outside the Brown Paper Bag is a collection of work by artist Ashley A. Jones that explores the complex experience African American women have with the standardized ideas of beauty, while addressing issues surrounding hair, politics, classism, acceptance, and identity. As a subcategory of racism, colorism has encouraged an ideological mode of thinking that places favoritism upon lighter skin tones, straight hair, and other European phenotypic characteristics. The work in this exhibition also shows the role that African American women play in continuing this narrative of discrimination, while asking the viewer to explore and judge for themselves where they stand in this controversial social phenomenon.

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